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17-03-2019 22:26

Ethan Crenson

Found yesterday in New York City.  Substrate is a

18-03-2019 12:06

Enrique Rubio Enrique Rubio

Hi to everybodyThese minute, white, sessile, pruin

18-03-2019 11:32

Peter Püwert Peter Püwert

Hi all, here I find no solution. Apos max. 1 x o,

11-03-2019 14:02

Elisabeth Stöckli

 Bonjour, Récolté sur branche morte de lierre

17-03-2019 22:36

Joop van der Lee

Found on deer dung.Disk: White later brown when ov

17-03-2019 21:38

Ethan Crenson

Hello all, In New York City yesterday I came acro

17-03-2019 10:12

Pintos Angel Pintos Angel

Good morning,  has anybody information about Nect

17-03-2019 13:54

peter peperkamp

can  someone give me a hint ? on  pinus cone

17-03-2019 12:12

Thomas Læssøe

A very tiny disco accompanied by Venturiocistella

16-03-2019 21:18

Thorben Hülsewig

Hi there, some days ago i found on bark from Malu

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Arachnopeziza delicatula ... or A. aurata?
Ethan Crenson, 28-11-2018 19:35
Hello all!
In New York City this weekend I found what I think is Arachnopeziza delicatula. The fruiting bodies are very small, the largest approximately 1.3mm. They are white when young, the hymenium becoming dull orange with age. They are surrounded by a sparse white subiculum. The substrate is well rotted hardwood, probably Quercus.

Asci 75-104 by 8.7-12.4µm. Some are rather pointed at the tip others more rounded (but I only noticed these after I applied a lot of pressure to the cover slip), IKI+


Spores hyaline, borne parallel in the asci, long and slender slightly thinner at one end, mostly 3-septate, up to 6-septate. (31-)37-49.5(-56.9)µm by 2.5-3.7µm.


Hairs septate, hyaline, with a bulbous base measuring about 7.5µm wide. Hairs tapering upward but at times with a swollen tip measuring about 5µm wide.


Paraphyses filiform, infrequently branched, septate, the tips sometimes deformed or swollen, but mostly not. Not more than 2µm wide at the tip.


Using Korf's Monograph of the Arachnopezizeae (1951) I arrived at Arachnopeziza delicatula based mostly on spore size and septation. The spores of my collection are shorter than Korf cites for A. aurata, but a little bit on the large side for A. delicatula. A. aurata seems to be more frequently collected in my area, but perhaps there is some confusion between A delicatula an A. aurata. Any opinions on this would be appreciated.


Thanks in advance.
Ethan

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Kosonen Timo, 28-11-2018 19:54
Kosonen Timo
Re : Arachnopeziza delicatula ... or A. aurata?
That's a good question. I have spent lately some time with Arachnopeziza aurata, even studied one herbarium specimen of A. delicatula (det. R. Korf). During the recent years collecting in Scandinavia has resulted in several observations of A. aurata, but not with a single collection of A. delicatula. Thinking about the variation in septation/size in A. aurata I don't think it is possible to distinguish between these two species. ...meaning all these recent collections belong to one species genetically, but spores fit to both descriptions. The base of the hair is one thing, but so far I have failed to observe any morphological pattern.

I can't rule out the existense of A. delicatula completely, but no sign of it yet. I think Zotto has a folder called "delicatula"...what ever that means :-).

cheers,
Timo
Hans-Otto Baral, 28-11-2018 21:04
Hans-Otto Baral
Re : Arachnopeziza delicatula ... or A. aurata?
Hi Ethan & Timo

I see the problem, but I think that when you restrict the spore analysis on mature spores (freshly ejected), you will have in A. aurata mainly 7-septate spores and in A. delicatula mainly 3-septate. The total absence of 7-septate spores in delicatula collections supports this.

Timo, did you ever find A. aurata on conifers? My folder delicatula is purely cpnifericolous, if I did not overlook something, and in my database on A. aurata is purely on angiosperm hosts.

Now, your, Ethan's, collection is obviously on an angiosperm, the wood surface looks so. I have no experience with American collections.

Ichecked available sequences and find that it is rather confusing. Above all, there does not seem to exist a sequence of a typical European A. aurata! ITS tree attached here.

A. delicatula is only present with one Japanese strain. Florian Prell's A. aurata is very distant, and I do not have a docu of it. But I have a folder that I call "aurata Ulex", it was previously "ulicis" in the Parachnopeziza folder.

Timo, do you have an ITS sequence and where does it cluster?

Zotto
Kosonen Timo, 28-11-2018 22:07
Kosonen Timo
Re : Arachnopeziza delicatula ... or A. aurata?
all right. I didn't realise the connection between "delicatula" folder and conifers. Nope, I have absolutely no records of A. aurata (or anything with long, slender spores) on conifers. It's on Betula and Populus here. All the aurata material I have would cluster there among Japanese/American aurata's. In Zotto's tree the other two A. aurata below are most definately something else.

Timo
Ethan Crenson, 29-11-2018 19:30
Re : Arachnopeziza delicatula ... or A. aurata?
Thank you for these comments.  I should have noted that my images and measurements of the ascospores were taken from ejected material. 

I do have the opportunity to sequence this collection, so hopefully I will be able to contribute something meaningful to this problem in the future if all goes well.

Again, thanks!

Ethan
Hans-Otto Baral, 03-12-2018 17:10
Hans-Otto Baral
Re : Arachnopeziza delicatula ... or A. aurata?
News about A. aurata: I made a mistake with Florian Prell's number, it is not 388 but FP155 (see attached trees).

I have checked in CBS by querying for his sequence and got 100% A. aurata from France, F. Mangenot (without location and eco-datam CBS 116.54), of which only LSU exists in the GenBank. So there's some sense in Florian's find and sequence!


In addition, I have overlooked two unpublished sequences of us. One is again this "ulicis" on Ulex wood, which falls to the American aurata and which I considered a Parachnopeziza when studied.


The other is A. aurata from Luxembourg, on Carpinus wood, which falls 100% to FP155.


I had not considered that a ITS few sequences are quite incomplete and cause extreme distances in the tree under Neighbor-joining.


Therefore, I have now calculated a tree with maximum likelihood and the result is attached. Also I calculated a tree which includes only 5.8S and ITS2, which contains only complete sequences and run under NJ.

This means that Japanese and American A. aurata do not seem to be true A. aurata.

Now Timo, it would really be interesting to include your sequences in the alignment. I would send the alignment to you if you want to check.
Zotto