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23-09-2018 14:10

Rubén Martínez Gil Rubén Martínez Gil

Hola a todos. Subo unas fotos de una Peziza que e

23-09-2018 13:36

Rubén Martínez Gil Rubén Martínez Gil

Hola a todos. Subo unas fotos de una Peziza que e

19-09-2018 15:30

Nicolas VAN VOOREN Nicolas VAN VOOREN

Bonjour.Je cherche une version digitale de ce docu

23-09-2018 05:26

xian zhang xian zhang

Hello everyone, Is this specimen Pachyella clypen

21-09-2018 11:57

Vasileios Kaounas Vasileios Kaounas

At the moment I do not have enough data.Just a fri

23-09-2018 22:21

Marc Detollenaere Marc Detollenaere

Good evening, On dead leaves of Ammophila I found

18-09-2018 14:10

Savic Dragisa

Is this Pachyella punctispora? I found it on a dam

24-09-2018 19:12

Castillo Joseba Castillo Joseba

Localizado ayer  en restos de madera de haya quem

21-09-2018 23:44

Edouard Evangelisti Edouard Evangelisti

Bonjour le forum, Pourriez-vous m'aider à confir

13-09-2018 19:17

Marc Detollenaere Marc Detollenaere

Dear forum, Yesterday I found setous fruit bodies

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Micropeziza karstenii
David Malloch, 27-06-2018 03:17
David MallochHello,

This collection appears to be the same species as one presented by Chris Yeates five years ago (http://www.ascofrance.fr/search_forum/24157) and tentatively identified as Micropeziza karstenii. Mine was growing on dead culms of Phalaris arundinacea completely submerged in water. Many of the ascomata were immature, so perhaps the ascospores would not be discharged until the water level went down and the ascomata were exposed to the air.

I have not yet been able to find any records of this species from North America and would like to be more certain of the identification before adding the record to our biological survey. Any comments would be appreciated.


Dave

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Hans-Otto Baral, 27-06-2018 20:52
Hans-Otto Baral
Re : Micropeziza karstenii
Hi David
this requires a living turgescent ascus in order to see if the spores are septate already inside the living asci. Judging from the appearance of the spores I suspect so, which would mean that it can hardly be a Micropeziza. Members of that genus I only know as having at maturity non-septate spores, i.e., spores are ejected when non-septate. Moreover, M. karstenii/poae/cornea has a high lipid content, unlike yours.

In Micropeziza the paraphyses are apically often swollen, and the VBs inside are more or less restricted to this inflated part. In your species the VBs are very elongate and reach far down. The spores are also distinctly larger than in that species.


What genus this belongs I cannot tell. Niptera could be a better alternative. You should test KOH whether it causes a yellow reaction at the moment when it comes in contact with the VBs. Niptera often shows this reaction.
Zotto

David Malloch, 28-06-2018 01:39
David Malloch
Re : Micropeziza karstenii
Hi Zotto,

Thank you for your valued observations.  I was afraid the identification was too easy! The fungus is very abundant in it's habitat so I will work further on getting a name for it.
Dave
Spooren Marco, 29-06-2018 17:42
Spooren Marco
Re : Micropeziza karstenii
Hello,

Why not Niptera excelsior  (P.Karst. ) Dennis ?(If I spelled the species-name correctly ? )

Best,

Marco
Hans-Otto Baral, 29-06-2018 20:41
Hans-Otto Baral
Re : Micropeziza karstenii
Niptera excelsior is = Mollisia excelsior, which differs in much longer spores with more septa: ca. 50-85 x 3-4.5 µm, 7-septate.

david, did you restudy the specimen, particularly regarding a possible KOH-reaction?
Zotto
David Malloch, 29-06-2018 21:15
David Malloch
Re : Micropeziza karstenii
Hi Zotto,
I tried applying 3% KOH to a water mount but did not see any fleeting yellow colour. The specimen is now dried and the paraphyses contain only a finely granular content, quite different from the fresh condition.  The KOH instantly clears the cell, but without any colour changes.

The fungus is interesting enough that I am planning to revisit the locality and collect more, hopefully in a more mature condition. Unfortunately this requires a 2-hour car trip from home followed by two more hours in a canoe.  Only another mycologist could appreciate such an obsession!
Dave
Spooren Marco, 29-06-2018 21:24
Spooren Marco
Re : Micropeziza karstenii
Hello,

Mollosia is not the correct name in the Index of Fungi, which I follow in these questions.There it is Niptera exelsior.The here depicted spores exceed 40 mu, and , according to the first discription, the spores are 40- 50 mu long, and several septate, the number of septa is not so important and can varieing.What the case is, is that the parafyses by N. exelsior have, when mature, a thickened apex, up to 7 mu, that do I not see in these pictures, but I think these depicted parafyses are very young.David, have you pictures of more mature parafyses?

Best,

Marco

I enclose a picture of spores and parafyses of N. excelsior as I interpret the species.
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David Malloch, 29-06-2018 21:48
David Malloch
Re : Micropeziza karstenii
Thank you very much for your comments Marco. None of my material is very mature, so the paraphyses may be less swollen apically than expected.  Material collected in another week or two should help in that regard.

The photos aren't very good, but do show that amount of swelling.  There is some obscure yellow colour in the KOH mount, but I don't think this is the reaction your are describing Zotto.

If the newly collected material is more mature perhaps we can get a culture and some useful sequences from it.
Dave

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Hans-Otto Baral, 29-06-2018 21:49
Hans-Otto Baral
Re : Micropeziza karstenii
Surely the number of septa varies a bit but the normal case is 7 in the different collections that I have under this name in my folder on my homepage (Mollisia, monocots without crystals).

Another difference is the high lipid content in excelsior vs. a very low content in David's fungus.

When you go to Dennis 1978 the spores of N. excelsior measure 50-80 x 3-4 µm.

From David's scale I measure 28-33 x 4.7-5.2 µm. David, did you also measure the spores?

Species Fungorum does not accept Niptera but Belonium, an antiquated opinion. This index is not at all up to date in every case, although it is continuously improved, as far as I know by one person concerning all fungi (!).

An unpublished  ITS sequence of M. excelsior exists which yields Mollisia minutella as closest match (94%). But I must admit that no true Niptera (s.str.) sequence exists in GenBank.
Zotto
Hans-Otto Baral, 29-06-2018 21:52
Hans-Otto Baral
Re : Micropeziza karstenii
The yellow reaction disappears within some seconds, at least after 15 seconds or so. Simply mounting in KOH is not appropriate, but I assume you added KOH to water and watched the KOH coming in. About 30% of Mollisia species show this reaction, often very intense, and also in Niptera s.str. it occurs.

By the way, your photos are splendid!!
Spooren Marco, 30-06-2018 11:16
Spooren Marco
Re : Micropeziza karstenii
Hello Zotto,

You are right about the spore- measures of N. excelsior; there was al little confusion at my side.

Best,

Marco